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04/07/19

Tour of the new building.... https://t.co/BNlTGda1Tj

03/07/19

Thumbs up on induction day, it's lunchtime! https://t.co/R91ppSarD0

02/07/19

Congratulations to the Harris Spelling Bee Champions from Sutton...👏👏👏 Amazing team! https://t.co/7k5QHfrq8Y

26/04/19

Outdoor Ampitheatre https://t.co/j9mnLV8TGL

26/04/19

CopperBox is Complete https://t.co/R8m77Byf6D

14/12/18

First Christmas Lunch, parents... please join for the PTA cake sale at 3.20pm https://t.co/JdW190JqzR

13/12/18

Enjoying Dickens's Day https://t.co/yG8fb2HVqn

19/10/18

Edible Cell models....yum yum! https://t.co/3gEIAT7ZfA

18/10/18

Main Hall.... https://t.co/tMvfFwogK3

Harris Academies
All Academies in our Federation aim to transform the lives of the students they serve by bringing about rapid improvement in examination results, personal development and aspiration.

Central Office

Bexley

Bromley

Croydon

Greenwich

Haringey

Havering

Merton

Newham

Southwark

Sutton

Thurrock

Wandsworth

Westminster

Self Harm

Self-harm is defined as: ‘The act of deliberately causing harm to oneself either by causing a physical injury, by putting oneself in dangerous situations and/or self-neglect’.

Why do people self-harm?

Self-harm can take a number of forms.  Self-harm is a way of coping and obtaining relief from a difficult and otherwise overwhelming situation or emotional state.  Someone who self-harms is usually in a state of high emotion, distress and inner-turmoil.  A person will often struggle with difficulties for some time before they self-harm.

Situations that can trigger self-harm:

  • Relationship problems with partners, friends or family
  • Pressures e.g. school work and exams, sporting performance, family issues
  • Bullying
  • Trying to fit in (some social groups are more accepting of self-harming behaviours)
  • Feeling bad about one’s self (guilt, shame, worthlessness)
  • Physical, emotional or sexual abuse
  • Feeling depressed

Self-harm and Suicide:

Whilst self-injury and suicide are separate, those who self-injure are in emotional distress and those who end their lives are also in emotional distress.  In addition, there is always the danger that self-harm could go wrong and cause death, although this may not have been the intention.  It is vital that all emotional distress is taken seriously to minimise the chances of self-injury, and suicide.  Any warning sign or talk of suicide must be taken seriously.

 What to do if a young person discloses that they are self-harming:

  • Listen to the young person in emotional distress calmly and explain that you are not judging them or their behaviour.
  • Do not assuring confidentiality.
  • Try to remain calm. Young people who self-harm can find it very hard to talk about what has happened and are often afraid of how people will react. The reaction a young person receives when they disclose their self-harm can have a critical influence on whether they go on to access supportive services. Any indication of a negative emotion or being judgmental is likely to aggravate the situation.
  • If the wounds are fresh, seek first aid treatment and assessment.
  • Members of staff should report incidents of self-harm in the same way as other safeguarding issues
  • Where parents/carers are aware of such instances, we would strongly recommend that school is informed.

If it is disclosed to the school that a student is self-harming

The student will be seen by one of the designated safeguarding leads in the school together another suitable member of staff except where parents/carers inform the school and provide information. 

If the student is expressing suicidal thoughts or is in imminent danger of causing themselves significant harm, parents/carers will be called and advised to take the child to A & E.  In extreme cases an ambulance will be called.  In these cases, the school is required to make a referral to the Multi-agency Safeguarding Hub (MASH).

Where the self-harm does not cause concern for the students immediate welfare, the Designated Safeguard Lead or Deputy Safeguard Lead will contact parents/carers and advise that a GP appointment is made.  Further support such as a meeting with the School’s Student Welfare officer, Student Counsellor or a referral to CAHMS will be discussed with the parents/carers.

Students will be advised:

  • Not to display open wounds/injuries.  These should be dressed appropriately.
  • To talk to the appropriate member of staff if they are in emotional distress
  • To alert a teacher if they suspect another student is self-harming or at serious risk of harm to themselves, and know when confidentiality must be broken.

Further information:

For further information on self-harm visit:-

www.youngminds.org.uk

www.mind.org.uk

www.nshn.co.uk

www.childline.org.uk

www.samaritans.org.uk

www.mentalhealth.org.uk